Schedule 2017

Schedule of Classes for Spring 2017

Please note that I may make changes and adjustments as the term progresses.

January
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
February
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28

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March
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 S P R I N G
19 B R E A K 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 A 1
April
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30

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May
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31

 

 

 

 

 

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General Directions

1. This course will use two books, please get the appropriate edition:

  • MS. Mingst & Snyder. Essential Readings in World Politics. 6th Edition. GET THIS EDITION.
  • HK. Kissinger, Henry. World Order. 2014. Penguin.
  • EC. Cohen, Eliot A. The Big Stick. 2017. Basic Books.

2. All other texts are available via hyperlink. Please note that many, if not all, are only available to students via login.

3. All readings should be read in the order presented. That is also their order of priority.

4. This schedule is subject to change.

5. Assignments will normally turned in either using EMAIL or Turnitin.com (directions to be provided in class).

All class meetings take place in PAC 107.

Required course readings are here to supplement course lectures. I will usually refer to the readings, but may not discuss all of them in detail. You will still be required to know the material for the purpose of exams.

Recommended course readings are here as optional material for students who want to explore a subject in greater depth. They can aid in the appreciation of the core lessons in the course, but knowledge of these readings is not expected.

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Class 1

What is IR and why do we care about it?

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Jack Snyder, “One World, Rival Theories,” from Foreign Policy.
  • HK. Introduction. “The Question of World Order.”

Wait List Form for IR

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Class 2

What is theory? What are the levels of analysis?

Course Activities: Form study cycle groups.

Readings:

Recommended:

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Class 3

The Development of the International System. What are states? And how did we get to where we are?

Course Activities: Group and individual work – practice in theory-building.

Readings:

Recommended:

  • MS. Krasner, Stephen D. “Sharing Sovereignty: New Institutions for Collapsed and Failing States.”

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Class 4

Classical Realism. What is anarchy? What is the security dilemma? What is the balance of power?

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Morgenthau, Hans. “A Realist Theory of International Politics.”
  • MS. Mearsheimer, John. “Anarchy and the Struggle for Power.”
  • MS. Thucydides, “Melian Dialogue,” from The Peloponnesian War
  • MS. Thomas Hobbes, from Leviathan.
  • HK. Chapter 5. Section on “India”.  (Begins on page 192 in the Penguin paperback edition).

Recommended:

  • MS. Morgenthau, Hans. “The Balance of Power”

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Class 5

Liberalism and Idealism. Is world peace possible? What are the prospects for international cooperation?

Course Activities:Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Doyle, Michael W. “Liberalism and World Politics.”
  • MS. Immanuel Kant, from Perpetual Peace
  • MS. Woodrow Wilson. “The Fourteen Points.”
  • MS. Francis Fukuyama, “The End of History”
  • EC. Introduction. “National Duties.”
  • EC. Chapter 1. “Why the United States?”

Recommended:

  • HK. Chapter 7. “Acting for All Mankind”: The United States and Its Concept of Order.

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Class 6

Neoliberal Institutionalism and Neorealism. How does our worldview shape our perception of whether international cooperation is possible?

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

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Class 7

Constructivism. Do ideas matter?

Course Activities: Lecture.

Readings:

  • MS. Wendt, Alexander. “Anarchy is what States Make of it: The Social Construction of Power Politics.”
  • MS. Michael N. Barnett and Martha Finnemore, “The Politics, Power, and Pathologies of International Organizations”
  • HK. Chapter 7. “Acting for All Mankind”: The United States and Its Concept of Order.”

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Check. Paper Prospectus Due

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Class 8

Other Theories. How many answers are there? Which ones are right?

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. V. I. Lenin, from Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism
  • MS. J. Ann Tickner, “Man, the State, and War: Gendered Perspectives on National Security”
  • MS. Fearon, James D. “Rationalist Explanations for War.”

Read ONE of the following:

  • MS. Jervis, Robert. “Hypotheses on Misperception.”
  • MS. Keren Yarhi-Milo, “In the Eye of the Beholder: How Leaders and Intelligence Communities Assess the Intentions of Adversaries”
  • Der Derian, James. 1990. “The (S)pace of International Relations: Simulation, Surveillance, and Speed.” International Studies Quarterly: 34, 3. (September): pp. 295 – 310.
  • Chirot, Daniel and Thomas D Hall. 1982. World-system theory. Annual Review of Sociology81-106.

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Class 9

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. Past Lessons.

Course Activities: Lecture.

Readings:

  • MS. Schelling, Thomas C. “The Diplomacy of Violence.”
  • Sagan, Scott D. 1988. “The Origins of the Pacific War.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History: 18, 4 (Spring): pp. 893 – 922.
  • MS. George F. Kennan (“X”), “The Sources of Soviet Conduct”
  • HK. Chapter 8. “The United States: Ambivalent Superpower.”

Recommended:

  • MS. Von Clausewitz, Carl. “War as an Instrument of Policy.”
  • Hughes, Jeffrey. 1988. “The Origins of World War II in Europe: British Deterrence Failure and German Expansionism.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History: 18, 4 (Spring): pp. 851 – 891.
  • HK. Chapter 7. “Acting for All Mankind”: The United States and Its Concept of Order.

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Class 10

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. War and Terror.

Course Activities: Lecture.

Readings:

  • MS. Kydd and Walter. “The Strategies of Terrorism.”
  • MS. Virginia Page Fortna, “Do Terrorists Win? Rebels’ Use of Terrorism and Civil War Outcomes”
  • H.K. Chapter 3. “Islamism and the Middle East: A World in Disorder.”
  • EC. Chapter 2. “Fifteen Years of War”
  • E.C. Chapter 5. “Jihadis.”

Recommended:

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Class 11

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. Weapons of Mass Destruction.

Course Activities: Lecture. Take-home midterm will be distributed sometime after this class.

Readings:

  • HK. Chapter 4. “The United States and Iran: Approaches to Order”.
  • EC. Chapter 6. “Dangerous States”

Recommended:

  • Kroenig, Matt. 2012. “Time to attack Iran.” Foreign Affairs.
  • MS. Waltz, Kenneth N. “Why Iran Should Get the Bomb: Nuclear Balancing Would Mean Stability”

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Class 12

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. Cyberwars and Outerspace.

Course Activities: Lecture and First Study Cycle Group Activity

Readings:

  • MS. Jon R. Lindsay, “The Impact of China on Cybersecurity”
  • HK. Chapter 9. Technology, Equilibrium, and Human Consciousness.”
  • EC. Chapter 7. “Ungoverned Space and the Commons.”
  • Segal, Adam. Excerpts from The Hacked World Order.

Recommended:

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Class 13

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. Cohen’s Prescriptions.

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • EC. Chapter 3. “The American Hand.”
  • EC. Chapter 4. “China”
  • EC. Chapter 8. “The Logic of Hard Power.”
  • EC. “Postscript: The Eagle’s Head”

 

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Take-Home Midterm Due

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SPRING BREAK

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Class 14

Study Cycle: Security and World Orders. Kissinger’s Views.

Course Activities: Lecture and Second Study Cycle Group Activity

Readings:

  • HK. Chapter 5. “The Multiplicity of Asia.”
  • HK. Chapter 6. “Toward an Asian Order: Confrontation.”
  • HK. Conclusion. “World Order in Our Time?”

Highly Recommended:

  • Review the “Research” portions of the User’s Guide to Political Science.

Recommended:

  • Review HK. Chapters 7 and 8.
  • MS. G. John Ikenberry, from Liberal Leviathan: The Origins, Crisis, and Transformation of the American World Order
  • MS. Nuno P. Monteiro, “Unrest Assured: Why Unipolarity Is Not Peaceful”
  • MS. Thomas J. Christensen, from The China Challenge: Shaping the Choices of a Rising Power
  • MS. Valerie M. Hudson and Andrea M. Den Boer, “Missing Women and Bare Branches: Gender Balance and Conflict”

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Class 15

Study Cycle: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. What do realists think about the role of morality in international affairs? How does a communitarian perspective differ from a morality of states perspective? Why do some cosmopolitans think we are responsible if someone dies of starvation someplace in Africa? Should other states intervene in the civil affairs of others? Why do states intervene in the civil affairs of others? Because of ethical concerns? Because of national interests? Or?

Course Activities: Lecture.

Readings:

  • Beitz, Charles R. 1979. “Bounded Morality: Justice and the State in World Politics.” International Organization: 33, 3
    (Summer): pp. 405 – 424.
  • MS. Martha Finnemore, from The Purpose of Intervention: Changing Beliefs About the Use of Force.

Recommended:

  • MS. Donnelly. “Human Rights and Cultural Relativism, from Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice.

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Class 16

Study Cycle: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. continued

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

Recommended:

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Class 17

Study Cycle: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. continued

Course Activities: Study Cycle Group Activity

Readings:

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Class 18

Study Cycle: Global Governance

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Keohane, Robert O. “From After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy.
  • MS. Mearsheimer, John J. “The False Promise of International Institutions.”
  • MS. Margaret E. Keck and Kathryn Sikkink, “Transnational Advocacy Networks in International Politics”

Recommended:

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Class 19

Study Cycle: The Global Economy: Trade and the Financial System

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Gilpin, Robert. “The Nature of Political Economy.”
  • MS. Stephen D. Krasner, “State Power and the Structure of International Trade”
  • MS. Ronald Rogowski, “Political Cleavages and Changing Exposure to Trade”

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Class 20

Study Cycle: The Global Economy: Trade and the Financial System

Course Activities: Study Cycle Presentation; Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Drezner, Daniel W. “The Irony of Global Economic Governance: The System Worked.”
  • MS. Jeffry Frieden, “The Governance of International Finance”

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Class 21

Study Cycle: Poverty & Inequality & Development

Readings:

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Rough Draft Due

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Class 22

Study Cycle: Poverty & Inequality & Development

Course Activities: Lecture and Study Cycle Presentation

Readings:

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Class 23

Study Cycle: The Environment

Course Activities: Study Cycle Presentation & Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Hardin, Garrett. “The Tragedy of the Commons.”
  • The Paris Agreement and Beyond: International Climate Change Policy Post-2020. 2016. Ed. Robert N. Stavins and Rovert C. Stowe. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Project on Climate Agreements.
    • You DO NOT need to print the whole thing!
    • Read the following sections:
      • David Victor. “Making the Promise of Paris a Reality.”
      • Lavanya Rajamani. “Differentiation and Equity in the Post-Paris Negotiations.”
      • READ at least ONE other article from that collection.

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Class 24

Study Cycle: Human Rights

Course Activities: Study Cycle Group Presentation, Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Makau Mutua, “Savages, Victims, and Saviors: The Metaphor of Human Rights”
  • MS. Beth A. Simmons, from Mobilizing for Human Rights
  • MS. Kenneth Roth, “Defending Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights: Practical Issues Faced by an International Human Rights Organization”

Recommended:

  • MS. Sen, Amartya. “Human Rights and Capabilities.”
  • MS. Donnelly, Jack. “Human Rights and Cultural Relativism.”

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Class 25

Course synthesis and Review

Readings:

Recommended:

  • Entire January/February 2017 Issue of Foreign Affairs: “Out of Order? The Future of the International System”

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Class 26

In-class Exam (covers second-half of course)

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end of classes

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May 18. Thursday. 12:00 pm

Final Research Paper Due

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