Schedule Fall 2009

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General Directions

1.  This course will use two books:

  • Bayliss, Smith and Owens.  The Globalization of World Politics. 4th Edition. (The schedule below will call this BSO)
  • Mingst & Snyder. Essential Readings in World Politics. Third Edition.  (The schedule below will call this MS).

2.  All other texts are available via hyperlink.  Please note that many, if not all, are only available to students via login.

3.  All readings should be read in the order presented. That is also their order of priority.

4.  This schedule is subject to change.

All class meetings take place in Downey Hall, Room 113.

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8 September 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

What is IR and why do we care about it? What is this course all about and what do I have to do to get an A?

Course Activities: Introductions ______________________________________________________________________________________

10 September 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

What is theory? What are the levels of analysis? What is power? What is the most powerful country in the world today?

Course Activities: Form study cycle groups.  Assign readings and news dates for class blog.

Readings:

  • Bernstein et al. 2000. “God Gave Physics the Easy Problems: Adapting Social Science to an Unpredictable World.” European Journal of International Relations, 6 (1): 43 – 76.
  • Baldwin, David A. 1979. “Power Analysis and World Politics.” World Politics, 31: 161-175; 186-187.

Recommended:

  • BSO. Smith, Bayliss and Owens. “Introduction.”

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15 September 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

(1) Building Theories.  (2) The Development of the International System.

Course Activities: Group and individual work – practice in theory-building.

Readings:

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17 September 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

The Development of the International System. What are states? And how did we get to where we are?

Course Activities: Lecture

News: Cordelia Hyland, Ari Fishman, Zain Alam, Zach Dixon

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 2. Armstrong, David. “The Evolution of International Society.”
  • BSO. Chapter 3. Scott, Len. “International history 1900 – 90”. – Gavin Swee

Recommended:

  • MS. Krasner, Stephen D. “Sharing Soveriegnty: New Institutions for Collapsed and Failing States.” Starts at page 176.

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22 September 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Classical Realism. What is anarchy? What is the security dilemma? What is the balance of power?

News: Max Livingston, Veronika Vackova, Jordan Gratch, Howard Tobochnik

Course Activities: Lecture

Readings:

  • MS. Thucydides. “Melian Dialogue.” Starts at page 12.
  • MS. Morgenthau, Hans. “A Realist Theory of International Politics.” Starts at page 56. – Jaimie Nguyen
  • BSO. Chapter 5. Dunne, Tim and Brian C. Schmidt. “Realism”
    • note: our focus here is on classical realism

Recommended:

  • MS. Morgenthau, Hans. “The Balance of Power”… Starts at page 131.
  • MS. Mearsheimer, John. “Anarchy and the Struggle for Power.” Starts at page 60.

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24 September 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Liberalism and Idealism. Is world peace possible? What are the prospects for international cooperation?

Course Activities: (1) Research Prospectus Due (2) Lecture

News: Sandy Yudhistira, Sam Plapinger

Readings:

  • MS. Kant, Immanuel. “To Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch.” Starts at page 14. – Howard Tobochnik
  • MS. Doyle, Michael W. “Liberalism and World Politics.” Starts at page 80. Sandy Yudhistira
  • BSO. Chapter 6. Dunne, Tim. “Liberalism.” – Ari Fishman

Recommended:

  • MS. Woodrow Wilson. “The Fourteen Points.” Starts at page 26.
  • MS. Pagden, Anthony. “Imperialism, Liberalism and the Quest for Perpetual Peace.” Starts at page 165.

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29 September 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Neoliberal Institutionalism and Neorealism. How does our worldview shape our perception of whether international cooperation is possible?

Course Activities: Lecture

News: BJ Lillis, Gavin Swee, Howard Tobochnik, Veronika Vackova

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 7. Lamy, Steven L. “Contemporary Mainstream Approaches: neorealism and neo-liberalism”
    • note: we will focus on these two approaches as demonstrated by Waltz and Keohane/Nye
  • Waltz, Kenneth. 1979. Chapter 8. “Structural Causes and Military Effects.” Theory of International Politics. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.
  • Keohane, Robert O. and Joseph Nye. 1977/1989. Power and Interdependence. Pages 3 – 35. – Sky Stallbaumer

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1 October 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Constructivism. Do ideas matter?

Course Activities: Lecture.

News: Taiki Sawabe, Cordelia Hyland, Ari Fishman, Zain Alam

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 9. Barnett, Michael. “Social Constructivism.”
  • MS. Wendt, Alexander. “Anarchy is what States Make of it: The Social Construction of Power Politics.” Starts at page 93. Zain Alam

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6 October 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Other Theories. How many answers are there? Which ones are right?

Course Activities: Lecture

News: Max Livingston, Sam Hoefle, Daniel Helgeson, Noor Al Saleh

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 8. Hobden and Jones. “Marxist theories of international relations” – BJ Lillis
  • BSO.  Chapter 10. Smith and Owens. “Alternative approaches to international theory.”

Read ONE of the following:

  • Structural Marxism: MS. Wallerstein, Immanuel. “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts for Comparative Analysis”. Starts at page 137.
  • On How the Individual Matters: MS. Jervis, Robert.  “Hypotheses on Misperception.” Starts at page 227.
  • Gendered Perspectives: MS. Tickner, J. Ann. “Man, the State, and War: Gendered Perspectives on National Security.” Starts at page 118.
  • Post-Modern: Der Derian, James.  1990. “The (S)pace of International Relations:  Simulation, Surveillance, and Speed.” International Studies Quarterly: 34, 3. (September): pp. 295 – 310. – Kevin Arritt

Also Recommended:

  • MS. Lenin, V.I. “From Imperialism, The Highest Stage of Capitalism: A Popular Outline.”  Starts at page 18.

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8 October 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 1: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. What do realists think about the role of morality in international affairs? How does a communitarian perspective differ from a morality of states perspective? Why do some cosmopolitans think we are responsible if someone dies of starvation someplace in Africa? Should other states intervene in the civil affairs of others?  Why do states intervene in the civil affairs of others?  Because of ethical concerns?  Because of national interests? Or?

Course Activities: Lecture.

News: Kevin Brisco, Lily Voravong, Michelle Kae

Readings:

  • Beitz, Charles R.  1979. “Bounded Morality:  Justice and the State in World Politics.”  International Organization: 33, 3
    (Summer):  pp. 405 – 424. – AhDream
  • BSO. Chapter 30.  Wheeler and Bellamy. “Humanitarian intervention in world politics.” – Jeremy Koegel

Recommended:

  • BSO. Chapter 11. Schapcott, Richard. “International Ethics”

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13 October 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 1: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. continued

Course Activities: Lecture and Movie

News: Jaime Nguyen, Taiki Sawabe, Jordan Gratch, Krysten Thomas

Readings:

  • MS. Valentino, Benjamin A. “From Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century.” Starts at page 368. Glamildi
  • MS. Power, Samantha. “Bystanders to genocide: why the United States let the Rwandan tragedy happen.” Starts at page 290. Hannah Lewis

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15 October 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 1: Ethics and Humanitarian Intervention. continued

Course Activities:

1. Study Cycle 1 Group Activity

2. Distribute take-home exam

News: BJ Lillis, EdMcDavid, Noor AlSaleh

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20 October 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Past World Wars.  Violence and global politics.

Course Activities:

1. TAKE-HOME EXAM DUE. Email to professor before class begins.

2. Lecture

News: Hannah Lewis, Rachel Levenson, Zach Dixon

Readings:

  • Sagan, Scott D.  1988. “The Origins of the Pacific War.”  Journal of Interdisciplinary History:  18, 4 (Spring):  pp. 893 – 922. – Taiki Sawabe
  • Hughes, Jeffrey.  1988. “The Origins of World War II in Europe:  British Deterrence Failure and German Expansionism.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History: 18, 4 (Spring):  pp. 851 – 891. – Jordan Gratch

Recommended:

  • MS. Von Clausewitz, Carl. “War as an Instrument of Policy.” Starts at page 334.
  • Review BSO. Chapter 3. Scott, Len. “International History 1900 – 90.”

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22 October 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 2:  Violence in the 21st Century. Focus on Lessons from the Cold War: Weapons of Mass Destruction

Course Activities: Lecture

News: Sandy Yudhistira, Lucas Mantilla, Jeremy Koegel, Glamildi Randon, EdMcDavid

Readings:

  • MS. Schelling, Thomas C. “The Diplomacy of Violence.” Starts at page 338.– Lily Voravong
  • MS. Kennan, George F. “The Sources of Soviet Conduct.”  Starts at 28. – Emma Nitzberg
  • BSO.  Chapter 22. Howlett, Darryl. “Nuclear proliferation.” – Kevin Brisco

Recommended:

  • BSO. Chapter 4.  Cox, Michael. “From the cold war to the war on terror.”

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FALL BREAK


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29 October 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 2: Violence in the 21st Century. Terrorism

Course Activities: Lecture.

News: Kevin Arritt, Hilary Hobel, Hannah Lewis

Readings:

  • MS. Pape, Robert A. “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism.” Starts at Page 398. – Michelle Kae
  • MS. Abrahms, Max. “Why Terrorism Does Not Work.” Starts at page 418. – Ed McDavid
  • BSO. Chapter 21. Kiras, James D. “Terrorism and Globalization” – Sam Hoefle

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3 November 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 2: Violence in the 21st Century. Afghanistan, Iraq and Beyond

Course Activities: Lecture

News: Michael Steves, Sam Hoefle, Daniel Helgeson, Jaimie Nguyen

Readings:

Recommended:

  • MS. Bush, George W. “The National Security Strategy of the United States of America.” Starts at page 47.

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5 November 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 2: Violence in the 21st Century. Afghanistan, Iraq and Beyond

Course Activities: Study Cycle 2 Group Presentation: Michelle Kae, Krysten Thomas, Emma Nitzberg, Jordan Gratch, Zach Dixon

News: Kevin Arritt, Kevin Brisco, Jeremy Koegel

Readings:

  • BSO.  Chapter 12. Sheehan, Michael. “The changing character of war.”
  • BSO.  Chapter 13. Bayliss, John. “International and global security.”

Read ONE of the following readings:

  • MS. Huntington, Samuel P. “The Clash of Civilizations?” Starts at page 203.
  • BSO.  Chapter 28. Acharya, Amitav. “Human security.”– Cordelia Hyland
  • MS. Ross, Michael L. “Oil, Drugs, and Diamonds: The Varying Roles of Natural Resources in Civil War.” Starts at page 441. – Krysten Thomas
  • MS. Cohn and Ruddick. “A Feminist Ethical Perspective on Weapons of Mass Destruction.” Starts at page 458. Noor Alsaleh
  • MS. Sagan, Scott D. “How to Keep the Bomb from Iran.” Starts at page 360. Laura Yim

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10 November 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 3: The Global Economy

Course Activities: Lecture

News: Madelein Manheim, Krysten Thomas

Readings:

  • BSO Chapter 14. Woods, Ngaire. “International political economy in an age of globalization.” – Sam Plapinger
  • BSO. Chapter 26. Scholte, Jan Art. “Global trade and finance.” Focus on pages 462 – 466. Max Livingston

Recommended:

  • MS. Gilpin, Robert. “The Nature of Political Economy.” Starts at page 479.
  • BSO. Chapter 1. McGrew, Anthony. “Globalization and global politics.”

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12 November 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 3: The Global Economy

Course Activities:

I. Study Cycle Group 3 Presentation:  BJ Lillis, Veronika Vackova, Max Livingston

II. Short lecture/discussion.

News: Lily Voravong, Glamildi Rondon, Sam Plapinger, Sky Stallbaumer

Readings:

  • Stiglitz, Joseph E. 2003. Chapter 1.  Globalization and Its Discontents.  W.W. Norton & Company:  New York.– Veronika Vackova
  • MS. Milner, Helen V. “Globalization, Development, and International Institutions: Normative and Positive Perspectives.” Starts at page 486. Madeleine Manheim
  • MS. Wolf, Martin.  “From Why Globalization Works.” Starts at page 509. Daniel Helgeson

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17 November 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 4: Poverty, Development & Trade

Course Activities:

I. Lecture.

II. Group 7 Presentation on Public Health: Lily Voravong, Ari Fishman, Rachel Levenson, Sandy Yudhistira

News: Rachel Levenson, Michelle Kae, Gavin Swee

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 27. Thomas, Caroline. “Poverty, development, and hunger.” – Lucas Mantilla
  • Jawara, Fatoumata and Aileen Kwa.  2003. Chapter Six.  Behind the scenes at the WTO:  the real world of international trade negotiations. Zed Books:  New York.

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19 November 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 4: Poverty, Development & Trade

Course Activities:

I. Study Cycle 4 Group Presentation: Madeleine Manheim, Hannah Lewis, Kevin Arritt, Zain Alam, Taiki Sawabe, Sam Plapinger

II. Short Lecture/Discussion.

News: Madeleine Manheim, AhDream Smith, Emma Nitzberg

Readings:

  • Birdsall, Nancy. 2008. “Introduction. Righting the Three-Legged Stool: Why Global Development Matters for Americans and What the Next President Should Do about It,” from The White House and the World: A Global Development Agenda for the Next U.S. President edited by Nancy Birdsall. Center for Global Development, Washington, DC. Rachel Levenson

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24 November 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 5: Global Governance & the Environment

Course Activities:

(1) Rough Drafts DUE, Rough Draft Workshop

(2) Mini-Lecture.

News: Sky Stallbaumer

Readings:

  • BSO. Chapter 17. Little, Richard. “International Regimes”
  • BSO. Chapter 20.  Vogler, John. “Environmental issues”

Recommended:

  • BSO.  Chapter 16. Reus-Smit, Christopher. “International Law”
  • All of Chapter 7 in “MS”.  (Some of these readings are assigned elsewhere, including Powers, Moravcsik, and Keck/Sikkink).
  • MS. Slaughter, Anne-Marie. “The Real New World Order.” Starts at page 195.

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1 December 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 5: Global Governance & the Environment

Course Activities:

I. Study Cycle 5 Group Presentation:  Howard Tobochnik, Ed McDavid, Jeremy Koegel, Daniel Helgeson

II. Short Lecture/Discussion.

News: Laura Yim, Hilary Hobel, AhDream Smith

Readings:

  • The link to both readings is HERE.
    • Betsill, Michele M. “Global Climate Change Policy: Making Progress or Spinning Wheels?” in The Global Environment:
      Institutions, Law and Policy. Eds Regina S. Axelrod, David Downie and Norman J. Vig
    • DeSombre, Elizabeth R. “Understanding United States Unilateralism: Domestic Sources of U.S. International Environmental Policy.” in The Global Environment: Institutions, Law and Policy. Eds Regina S. Axelrod, David Downie and Norman J. Vig.

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3 December 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Study Cycle 6: Human Rights and Transnational Actors

Course Activities: Mini-lecture. Study Cycle 6 Group Presentation (PART 1):  Michael Steves, Kevin Brisco, Lucas Mantilla, Jaimie Nguyen, Sky Stallbaumer, Gavin Swee, Cordelia Hyland. NOTE: it is possible both parts will be presented on December 3rd

News: Michael Steves, Lucas Mantilla, Laura Yim, Emma Nitzberg, Soumaya Ayari

Readings:

  • BSO.  Chapter 19.  Willetts, Peter. “Transnational actors and international organizations in global politics”– Hilary Hobel
  • MS. Keck, Margaret E. and Kathryn Sikkink. “Transnational advocacy networks in international and regional politics.”  Starts at page 279.
  • BSO. Chapter 29. Brown, Chris. “Human Rights.” – Michael Steves

Recommended:

  • MS. Sen, Amartya. “Universal Truths: Human Rights and the Westernizing Illusion.” Starts at page 598.
  • MS. Ignatieff, Michael. “The Attack on Human Rights.” Starts at 601.

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8 December 2009. Tuesday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Course synthesis and Review

Course Activities:

I. Study Cycle 6 Group Presentation (PART 2):  Michael Steves, Kevin Brisco, Lucas Mantilla, Jaimie Nguyen, Sky Stallbaumer, Gavin Swee, Cordelia Hyland.  NOTE: it is possible both parts will be presented on December 3rd

II. Lecture and Discussion.

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10 December 2009. Thursday. 2:40 – 4:00 pm

Course Activities:

In-class Exam (covers second-half of course)

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end of classes

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18 December 2009. Friday. 4:00 pm

Final Research Paper Due

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